Notes from a Master Procrastinator

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“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.”   (Charles Dickens, David Copperfield)

I know you’re out there. You know who you are. So these will all sound very familiar. “There are far too many icons on my desktop, better clean them up.” “How long has it been since I cleared my temporary internet files? Two, three  months??” “Man this desk is dust-yyyy!” “Will you just look at the crumbs in this keyboard? I really should do something about that.”

procrastination-group

More? No problem, because I assure you I’m an endless well of excuses not to write. I admit, there’s something so freeing about the empty canvas feeling of a blank page. And also so unyieldingly daunting.

“Lemme just check my email real quick. Oh those annoying ads in the margins. What’s that…JCrew….SALE??”

Okay, let’s get down to brass tacks. How much new content did you actually W R I T E last week? Not thought about, planned, considered, but actually typed and saved somewhere. Last Monday through Sunday evening, blogs, books, stories, journals, everything counts except emails. 3 pages? 10? 50?

Start Small

I know how it is, and I know how lame it feels when the “don’t have time to write” excuse, which has worked for a while, falls flat. Writing is a habit, and habits are easy to make and break. If you’re in the habit of procrastinating your writing practice, create a new habit for writing every day. It might be easier than you think.

Day 1 5 Mins 10 Mins 15 20 30 45
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5

Do you write longhand in a journal or prefer a keyboard? Are you midstream through a writing project or about to begin something new? For today, write for 5 minutes. Anything, about any subject, but keep your fingers moving nonstop for 5 minutes.. Then put a little check mark in the 5 min column of Day 1. Congratulations – you’ve just started a new habit! Tomorrow, write for 10. These small goals might seem ridiculous, but they help build the repetition of constancy and achievement, which will make you want to go back for more and keep building on this skill. There’s one catch – no going backwards. If you write for 20 minutes one day, you must write for at least 20 the next day. The idea is to challenge yourself but set bite-sized, realistic goals that you can actually follow…longterm.

One of my first writing teachers, Natalie Goldberg, teaches about nonstop writing practice in her amazing book “Writing Down the Bones”.

Let me know if this works for you, or how you battle the constant temptation for “maybe later” on your own writing journey. I want to hear from you!

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2 thoughts on “Notes from a Master Procrastinator

  1. John Orman

    Lisa, I was going to post a comment to your procrastination essay before the New Year started–but somehow I never got around to it! Guess I should take your challenges to heart!

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