Does your writing life need Feng Shui?

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Curious about Feng Shui but a bit bewildered by it? Good, me too. Read on.

When I first started researching this ancient art of placement and spatial arrangement, I felt totally overwhelmed and daunted. There’s just so much to learn and absorb. What’s a bagua? Why do I need a compass (do I even own one)? From tai chi and yoga, I’ve learned a little bit about energy. But the energy of a room, of a desk, a doorway? To be honest, it sounded a little new-agey to me.

As I continued reading, I started learning more about Qi and realized that the science behind Feng Shui is about maximizing auspicious (beneficial) elements in a room so they don’t hinder the flow of energy. So not necessarily the Qi of a desk, but more like analyzing what objects or situations near or on the desk might be blocking the flow of that Qi.

What does all this have to do with writing? Everything. Writing requires that we harness our inner flow of creative energy and imagination to tell stories. The type of stories doesn’t matter. Fiction, nonfiction, they’re all ultimately stories. Writing is hard work and requires not only time but commitment and focus. And small changes can make it easier and more fun.

Where do you write? Lying on the floor with a pen and journal, on the couch with your iPad, noisy coffeeshop, or upright at a desk typing on a keyboard? Do you feel that your typical writing location helps or hinders your flow of creative energy? If you haven’t yet uncovered your perfect writing spot or if you dread the very sight of your desk, simple Feng Shui changes could make a huge impact on how that space feels. Like anything else, it’s best to consult a trained expert on the subject, and I’m the farthest thing from that. But I have spent a couple of years reading about tips and tricks and I can attest to their efficacy in how they’ve helped me feel focused, productive, and excited about going to my writing space at home. I’ve also included lots of links in this post to Feng Shui experts and consultants.

We all have too much clutter in at least some area of our lives. Hopefully your writing desk doesn’t look like this:

bad desk

Aside from the obvious hoarding tendencies, lack of organization and a 45-year old chair, this space lacks a few other essential elements – lighting, for one thing. Check this out:

classic-home-office-design-idea

So the desk/writing surface here is large, which is great. And they’ve got an ergonomic adjustable arm for a computer monitor, which saves tons of space. Love it! More points for the live plant in the corner of the desk. But the best part, of course, is the huge French window with a view of the woods. A nice view, simply put, will make you want to be there. Even if your writing space looks nothing like the picture above, I guarantee you could make your space feel just as aesthetic and inviting, and it might be easier than you think.

Some basic tips:

Don’t use a u-shaped desk or arrange your desk facing a wall, as these orientations could make you feel boxed in. There should be enough space for you to walk completely around your desk and it should preferably be facing the entry to the room. Situate your desk katty corner facing the door for an optimal “command position”.

Don’t put a trash can beneath the desk, as this could impact your writing success. Why? A trash can or waste container is likely to attract challenging, low-energy vibes. Set it out from under the desk and empty it frequently so as to not cause stagnation.

Stimulate your creative juices by hanging inspiring art or decorative objects on the walls. Find an image that makes you feel good, gives you energy, and draws you in. I prefer abstract art because, to me, it looks like a question that wants to be answered.

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Manage clutter! I have no drawers in my writing desk, which is a constant challenge causing me to be creative about what I store and where. I found an open, 3-shelved bookcase, which is perfect for housing decorative office storage boxes. You can find them in almost any color and size to match the vibe and color scheme of your home office.

modern-desk-accessories      IMG_7034

Confession: I’m obsessed with pens. I gather, collect, store, and hoard them, and openly steal them from my friends and colleagues. As a lifelong writer, I seriously feel on some level that all pens are just simply intrinsically mine. So one of my most successful de-cluttering tactics was to a) locate all my pens, b) pitch hundreds (literally) of broken, inkless relics, c) buy new ones, and d) display them on my desktop. Releasing that which we no longer need makes s p a c e in our lives and minds for more useful things, like ideas.

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To read more about desk organization, click here.

Next: cables. Look under your desk. What do you see?

Week_9_A_cluster_of_cables_under_the_desk_1280x3000

Even if your desktop is clean, well-organized and aesthetic, an atmosphere of unaddressed chaos beneath it can sabotage your writing process. How about this?

IKEA-Signum-Cable-Organizer

Check out cableorganizer.com for ideas.

If after renovating your writing area you’re ready to get serious about Feng Shui, you can easily find a certified Feng Shui consultant online in your area. Typically an initial consultation takes 2-3 hours, and be prepared to take lots of notes! They’ll prepare a list of recommendations along with alternatives. In other words, if you’re not willing to move your home office out of the damp basement, they’ll recommend ideas for making that environment more hospitable and conducive to how you want to use it.

Want to learn more?

http://life.gaiam.com/article/how-feng-shui-your-home-office

http://video.about.com/fengshui/Feng-Shui-for-a-Home-Office.htm

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4 thoughts on “Does your writing life need Feng Shui?

  1. Aaaargh.
    Lisa, I wrote a big long Comment and then it crashed when I tried to
    make a copy before posting it !
    I’ll try again, but
    meanwhile am sending this one to see how it works . . . . .

  2. Blake Myton

    Excellent blog post. It is indeed true that energy is of the utmost importance in regard to the overall habitability of a living space. Visual clutter and incorrect arrangements of features in a room can disrupt the mind and confuse the eyes. Thank you for giving this thoughtful and sensible post to help others improve the flow of energy in their own homes.

  3. Natalka

    Lisa,
    My ex coworkers thought I was crazy, arranging & rearranging my space and discussing how the ” room just didn’t feel right to do work in “, but it was all because of the Feng Shui. Actually, the only one who supported my efforts was the copywriter who wrote a book on Feng Shui; go figure.
    Great and engaging post. Plus glad to know I’m not the only pen stealer/hoarder out there.
    Can’t wait to read more!

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