Author Spotlight: DIANA DUFF

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The genius of Diana Duff’s writing is its elegant simplicity. “It seems such a strange thing to be doing, I thought, however ordinary the surroundings: waiting in a coffee shop in Oxford Street with the London traffic roaring outside, for my mother, whom I would not recognize when she finally arrived.”

With a path that led her from South Africa to Ireland, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania, Ms. Duff’s page-turner memoir, Leaves from the Fig Tree reads more like an adventure novel, submerging us in the vastly different worlds she has known with a story of isolation, travel, rebellion, love, and freedom.

At age 2, she was transported from South Africa to her family’s historic estate in rural Ireland, County Cork, in a Victorian estate called Annesgrove (originally Ballyhimmock), built in the 1700s.

A descendant of the brother of the Earl of Annesley, Diana’s pedigree isolated her as a child within the rigid confines of Victorian life in rural Ireland, with no siblings or other companions except a series of ill-equipped governesses, juxtaposed with the expansive freedom and wild magic of the Africa that called to her again and again.

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I talked with Diana from her home in Johannesburg about her story and her writing path:

You were quite the globe-trotter! You went to Kenya from Ireland at age 18, then stayed in Kenya and Tanzania until you were 30, when you went to South Africa. What do you remember most about Africa in your early days there? There was a freedom there that allowed people to live an eccentric way of life doing their own thing. During that time, it was not a very structured society, and it was a fantastic place to live. People were really individuals, they didn’t try to fit into any social system or way of behavior, and they didn’t need to. Kenya was my freedom.

How did living in the midst of the Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya impact your view of the world? I was so young, I didn’t really appreciate the dangers. But we certainly lived in the middle of it all.

In thinking about writing mechanics, is there one thing that you consistently see writers getting wrong? Nowadays there is a tendency to overdo the shock tactics, and maybe that’s required the way the world is now. It seems that authors feel pressured to write about sensationalist topics rather than writing what they feel strongly about, what moves them. And those books aren’t like art and it’s less of a pleasure to read them. In Isak Dineson’s Out of Africa, for example, you can really see the people, you can feel them.

Which is your preference for the books you read – fiction or nonfiction? What are you reading currently? Though I read mostly fiction now, I’m also reading Heat by Ranulph Fiennes and The Story of an African Farm by Olive Schreiner.

Since you’ve seen so much of our world, what do you think is most different about it now compared with when you were younger? Politics, power and money seem to be the ruling factors today. A drive towards material wealth takes all the color out of life  and is not at all appealing. But there are still magical places in the world. Where I work, we have a lovely Moonlight Market – an evening, outdoor organic market with organic foods and lots of gems and minerals, which attract amazing people with amazing stories. Stories are the common thread for me, for everyone.

Everybody’s interesting. Every single

person has got a story to tell.

At age 85, Diana still works – at Bryanston Organic Natural Market, an organic outdoor market and gem and mineral store, where she meets fascinating people every day. “Today I met a man who’s building a life center on Green Island (Queensland), I met two Americans, someone who’d gone to Malaysia on a canoe trip, and someone who’d been gored by a hippo.” And she has written another story (fiction this time), which takes place in Tanzania.

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Diana’s book, Leaves from the Fig Tree is published by Rebel e Publishers in Kindle, paperback, and other digital formats and can be purchased on Amazon.

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Notes from a Master Procrastinator

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“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.”   (Charles Dickens, David Copperfield)

I know you’re out there. You know who you are. So these will all sound very familiar. “There are far too many icons on my desktop, better clean them up.” “How long has it been since I cleared my temporary internet files? Two, three  months??” “Man this desk is dust-yyyy!” “Will you just look at the crumbs in this keyboard? I really should do something about that.”

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More? No problem, because I assure you I’m an endless well of excuses not to write. I admit, there’s something so freeing about the empty canvas feeling of a blank page. And also so unyieldingly daunting.

“Lemme just check my email real quick. Oh those annoying ads in the margins. What’s that…JCrew….SALE??”

Okay, let’s get down to brass tacks. How much new content did you actually W R I T E last week? Not thought about, planned, considered, but actually typed and saved somewhere. Last Monday through Sunday evening, blogs, books, stories, journals, everything counts except emails. 3 pages? 10? 50?

Start Small

I know how it is, and I know how lame it feels when the “don’t have time to write” excuse, which has worked for a while, falls flat. Writing is a habit, and habits are easy to make and break. If you’re in the habit of procrastinating your writing practice, create a new habit for writing every day. It might be easier than you think.

Day 1 5 Mins 10 Mins 15 20 30 45
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5

Do you write longhand in a journal or prefer a keyboard? Are you midstream through a writing project or about to begin something new? For today, write for 5 minutes. Anything, about any subject, but keep your fingers moving nonstop for 5 minutes.. Then put a little check mark in the 5 min column of Day 1. Congratulations – you’ve just started a new habit! Tomorrow, write for 10. These small goals might seem ridiculous, but they help build the repetition of constancy and achievement, which will make you want to go back for more and keep building on this skill. There’s one catch – no going backwards. If you write for 20 minutes one day, you must write for at least 20 the next day. The idea is to challenge yourself but set bite-sized, realistic goals that you can actually follow…longterm.

One of my first writing teachers, Natalie Goldberg, teaches about nonstop writing practice in her amazing book “Writing Down the Bones”.

Let me know if this works for you, or how you battle the constant temptation for “maybe later” on your own writing journey. I want to hear from you!